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Cheryl L. Day, PhD

Assistant Professor
Emory Vaccine Center

Assistant Research Professor
Hubert Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University

Researcher
Yerkes National Primate Research Center

Investigator
Emory Center for AIDS Research

Phone: 404-727-9425

Fax: 404-727-9316

Email: cday@emory.edu

Dr. Day received her PhD from Harvard University in 2003 in the Virology program of the Division of Medical Sciences. Her graduate work focused on the role of CD4 T cells in hepatitis C virus infection. She was awarded a post-doctoral fellowship from the Royal Society in the United Kingdom to pursue research at the University of Oxford investigating the phenotype and function of HIV-specific CD8 T cells. While a post-doc at Oxford, she obtained additional funding from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation to conduct HIV cellular immunology research on-site in Durban, South Africa. As an Instructor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Dr. Day expanded her immunology studies in Durban to TB/HIV co-infection. She subsequently joined the faculty of the University of Cape Town to pursue research on T cell immunology in individuals with latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and active pulmonary TB disease. In 2010, Dr. Day joined Emory University as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Global Health at the Rollins School of Public Health. She is also a Core Scientist at the Emory Vaccine Center, and holds a joint appointment as an Honorary Research Associate at the University of Cape Town. She is currently developing a research program in human T cell immunology of TB and TB/HIV co-infection with the aim of deciphering the role of T cells in successful immune control of M. tuberculosis infection.

Research Interests

Dr. Day received her PhD from Harvard University in 2003 in the Virology program of the Division of Medical Sciences. Her graduate work focused on the role of CD4 T cells in hepatitis C virus infection. She was awarded a post-doctoral fellowship from the Royal Society in the United Kingdom to pursue research at the University of Oxford investigating the phenotype and function of HIV-specific CD8 T cells. While a post-doc at Oxford, she obtained additional funding from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation to conduct HIV cellular immunology research on-site in Durban, South Africa. As an Instructor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Dr. Day expanded her immunology studies in Durban to TB/HIV co-infection. She subsequently joined the faculty of the University of Cape Town to pursue research on T cellimmunology in individuals with latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and active pulmonary TB disease. In 2010, Dr. Day joined Emory University as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Global Health at the Rollins School of Public Health. She is also a Core Scientist at the Emory Vaccine Center, and holds a joint appointment as an Honorary Research Associate at the University of Cape Town. She is currently developing a research program in human T cell immunology of TB and TB/HIV co-infection with the aim of deciphering the phenotypic and functional characteristics of T cells associated with successful immune control of M. tuberculosis infection.